Hymenoptera in the news

Hymenoptera in the news

Postby crex on 17 Sep 2008, 14:23

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Re: Hymenoptera in the news

Postby Eckart Stolle on 17 Sep 2008, 16:22

The last discovery of a new ant species was in 1923, he added.


although this is clearly wrong. there tons of new ant species described every year. also old fossils had been found recently...

a nice thing still.
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Re: Hymenoptera in the news

Postby Eckart Stolle on 17 Sep 2008, 20:11

in a different news story i read this:

"This is the first time that a new subfamily of ants with living species has been discovered since 1923 (other new subfamilies have been discovered from fossil ants)."


http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 174538.htm


sometimes journalists should not shorten everything so much until it gets wrong...
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Re: Hymenoptera in the news

Postby Simo V. on 18 Sep 2008, 08:22

Alex Wild's blog wrote:Eureka! Heureka! An Astonishing New Ant!


http://myrmecos.wordpress.com/2008/09/1 ... g-new-ant/

That blog has nice summary, links, and some debate about ´the first new ant species since 1923' :P
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Re: Hymenoptera in the news

Postby crex on 18 Sep 2008, 17:09

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Re: Hymenoptera in the news

Postby Camille Thirion on 19 Sep 2008, 23:09

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Re: Hymenoptera in the news

Postby Eckart Stolle on 20 Sep 2008, 00:18

the original paper:

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2008/ ... 8f2e860163

If someone needs the paper, but cant DL it pls contact me.

cheers
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Re: Hymenoptera in the news

Postby crex on 23 Sep 2008, 20:12

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Re: Hymenoptera in the news

Postby Simo V. on 24 Sep 2008, 06:40

That's pretty interesting news.It seems that more you investigate insect intelligence the more intriguing it gets. In addition to hymenoptera, jumping spiders are pretty intelligent too, see e.g. Portia jumping spiders and their behavior. Arthropods are not stupid after all... :D

btw, this is the title of the orginal article: Sheehan, M. J. & Tibbetts, E. A. 2008. Robust long-term social memories in a paper wasp. Current Biology 18: R851-R852
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Re: Hymenoptera in the news

Postby crex on 13 Jan 2009, 09:18

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Re: Hymenoptera in the news

Postby Eckart Stolle on 13 Jan 2009, 11:05

interesting... - here is the original paper: http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2009/ ... 6.abstract

I've similar observations from some parsitic flies and their hostspecies...

cheers
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Re: Hymenoptera in the news

Postby Simo V. on 13 Feb 2009, 09:59

Nature news wrote:Viral DNA delivers wasp's sting - Origins of virus-like particles confirmed

The research sheds light on the origins of particles that some parasitic wasps inject, along with their eggs, into caterpillars. These particles, called polydnaviruses, carry genes that halt the caterpillar's immune response when expressed, allowing the wasp larvae to grow.

Scientists already suspected that polydnaviruses had a viral origin, but the study "provides an important bit of information indicating who the ancient ancestor probably was", says Michael Strand, an entomologist at the University of Georgia in Athens who has worked with one of the study's authors. It makes sense that polydnaviruses come from nudiviruses, he says, because nudiviruses commonly infect the reproductive tracts of insects.


http://www.nature.com/news/2009/090212/full/news.2009.97.html
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