new important systematic/ phylogeny/ classification papers

new important systematic/ phylogeny/ classification papers

Postby Eckart Stolle on 29 Jun 2008, 14:54

Zootaxa 1668: 521-548 (21 Dec. 2007) 14 plates; 149 references
Phylogeny and Classification of Hymenoptera
MICHAEL J. SHARKEY (USA)
Abstract
An overview of recent advances in our understanding of the higher phylogeny and classification is presented.
Molecular and morphological cladistic and pre-cladistic studies are summarized. A superfamily-level classifi-
cation of the Hymenoptera is offered to reflect recent advances in our understanding of the phylogenetic rela-
tionships of the Hymenoptera. It differs from most recent classifications in the recognition of the Diaprioidea,
to include Diapriidae, Monomachidae, and Maamingidae.
Key words: Diaprioidea, taxonomy, cladistics, life history, Insecta
PDF (open access) http://www.mapress.com/zootaxa/2007f/zt01668p563.pdf

--> good summary listing the important recent papers on this topic

greetz
Eckart
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Re: Ant Phylogeny & Classification

Postby Eckart Stolle on 29 Jun 2008, 15:13

Zootaxa 1668: 549-563 (21 Dec. 2007) 2 plates; 80 references
Phylogeny, classification, and species-level taxonomy of ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)
PHILIP S. WARD (USA)
Abstract
The current state of ant systematics is reviewed. In recent years substantial progress has been made in identifying the
major clades of ants and the relationships among them. Earlier inferences about ant phylogeny based on morphology
have been refined and modified as a result of a recent influx of molecular (DNA sequence) data and new fossil discover-
ies. It is now apparent that much of the biological and taxonomic diversity of ants is contained within the “formicoid
clade” which comprises 14 of the 20 extant subfamilies and about 90% of all species. Whether the remaining groups of
extant ants (Leptanillinae and the poneroid subfamilies) represent a clade or a grade at the base of the ant tree remains
unresolved. The fossil record for crown group ants extends back to 90–100 mya. Stem ants (sphecomyrmines, armani-
ines) were also present during this period. Molecular divergence date estimates that take into account the fossil record of
both ants and other Hymenoptera suggest that crown group ants arose ~115–135 mya. Most of the extant ant subfamilies
and genera are well defined morphologically and likely monophyletic, but there are some notable exceptions including
the subfamily Cerapachyinae and several large and ambiguously delimited genera such as Pachycondyla. Several tribes
in the large subfamilies Formicinae and Myrmicinae also represent artificial assemblages. Finally, while the species-
level taxonomy of some ant genera is in a satisfactory state, taxonomic anarchy reigns in others, with numerous ill-
defined species and many names of uncertain applicability. Progress in this area of ant systematics will require sustained
individual efforts, expansion of job opportunities, enlistment of new technologies, and a deeper understanding of the
nature of ant species and the differences between them.
Key words: ant systematics, molecular phylogenetics, alpha-taxonomy, fossils, formicoid clade

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http://www.mapress.com/zootaxa/2007f/zt01668p563.pdf
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Re: new important systematic/ phylogeny/ classification papers

Postby Eckart Stolle on 19 Oct 2008, 16:34

Erik M. Pilgrim, Carol D. von Dohlen & James P. Pitts 2008
Molecular phylogenetics of Vespoidea indicate paraphyly of the superfamily and novel relationships of its component families and subfamilies
http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/jour ... 1&SRETRY=0

ABSTRACT
The 24 000+ described species of Vespoidea include many well-known stinging wasps, such as paper wasps and hornets (Vespidae), velvet ants (Mutillidae), spider wasps (Pompilidae) and ants (Formicidae). The compelling behaviours of vespoids have been instrumental in developing theories of stepwise evolutionary transitions, which necessarily depend on an understanding of phylogeny, yet, existing morphological phylogenies for Vespoidea conflict. We collected molecular data from four nuclear genes (elongation factor-1α F2 copy, long-wavelength rhodopsin, wingless and the D2–D3 regions of 28S ribosomal RNA (2700 bp in total)) to produce the first molecular phylogeny of Vespoidea. We analysed molecular data alone and in combination with published morphological data from Brothers and Carpenter. Parsimony analyses left many deeper nodes unsupported, but suggested paraphyly of three families. Total-evidence Bayesian inference produced a more resolved tree, in which the monophyly of Vespoidea was nevertheless ambiguous. Bayesian inference of molecular data alone returned a well-resolved consensus with posterior probabilities of over 95% for most nodes. We used this topology as the best estimate of phylogeny at the family and subfamily levels. Notable departures from previous estimates include: (i) paraphyly of Vespoidea resulting from the nesting of Apoidea within a lineage comprising Formicidae, Scoliidae and two subfamilies of Bradynobaenidae; (ii) paraphyly of Bradynobaenidae, Mutillidae and Tiphiidae; (iii) a sister relationship between Rhopalosomatidae and Vespidae; and (iv) Rhopalosomatidae + Vespidae as sister to all other vespoids/apoids. We discuss character evidence in light of the new phylogeny, and propose a new classification of Aculeata that recognizes eight superfamilies: Apoidea, Chrysidoidea, Formicoidea, Pompiloidea, Scolioidea, Tiphioidea, Thynnoidea and Vespoidea




Notes:
Interesting paper.
They only used sequences from 4 genes, but still its gonna b useful.
But the amout of samples of the Vespidae, Formicidae, Apoidea and Chrysidoidea are quite small - interesting/new findings of them regard the position of Apoidea within the Vespoidea near Scoliidae and the Chrysididae/Formicidae, so they certainly should have increased the sample size there. They themselves write "Taxon sampling strategy is an important component of phylogenetic analyses, because outcomes are often sensitive to the number and identity of taxa". Chrysidoidea were used as outgroup, but its relatively close related so its maybe prone to errors, therefore a larger samplesize should be used here, or (or better as an addition) a more far outgroup like some Ichneumonidae or such.

Interesting was this note:
"Certain interesting relationships found in the MP (Maximum parsimony) tree, but not supported by the bootstrap, were the following: Chrysidoidea was paraphyletic due to the position of Hedychridium (Chrysididae) as sister to the ants (Formicidae). Vespoidea were rendered paraphyletic by the position of Hedychridium, and by Apoidea, which nested inside Vespoidea as sister to Scoliidae."

The output of that one analysis, the position of the Hedychridium is clearly wrong. There is absolutely no doubt that Hedychridium is part of the Chrysididae and not close to the Formicidae. Seems they solved that problem in another analysis.
The proposed position of Apoidea and their finding for the Mutillidae/Tiphiidae are interesting, but it should be supported in another study with larger sample size and more genes. There is still much to resolve in this group.

The new finding are still quite interesting, especially regarding the evolution of sociality within the hymenoptera, which was thought to been evolved several times (based on different phylogenies).

Cheers
Eckart
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Re: new important systematic/ phylogeny/ classification papers

Postby Bilule on 06 Jul 2010, 10:13

Eckart Stolle wrote:Zootaxa 1668: 521-548 (21 Dec. 2007) 14 plates; 149 references
Phylogeny and Classification of Hymenoptera
MICHAEL J. SHARKEY (USA)
Abstract
An overview of recent advances in our understanding of the higher phylogeny and classification is presented.
Molecular and morphological cladistic and pre-cladistic studies are summarized. A superfamily-level classifi-
cation of the Hymenoptera is offered to reflect recent advances in our understanding of the phylogenetic rela-
tionships of the Hymenoptera. It differs from most recent classifications in the recognition of the Diaprioidea,
to include Diapriidae, Monomachidae, and Maamingidae.
Key words: Diaprioidea, taxonomy, cladistics, life history, Insecta
PDF (open access) http://www.mapress.com/zootaxa/2007f/zt01668p563.pdf

--> good summary listing the important recent papers on this topic

greetz
Eckart


Hi,
The right link to this paper is:
http://mapress.com/zootaxa/2007f/zt01668p548.pdf
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