new literature

new literature

Postby Eckart Stolle on 23 Jun 2008, 12:33

Just to collect new publications on Hymenoptera (i didnt get how to make new entries in to hymis library)

Jong-Wook LEE, Giuseppe Fabrizio TURRISI (2008) First record of the family Aulacidae in Korea (Hymenoptera: Evanioidea)
Entomological Research 38 (2) , 114–118 doi:10.1111/j.1748-5967.2008.00146.x
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/ab ... 08.00146.x
Abstract: The family Aulacidae with one species, Pristaulacus intermedius Uchida, 1932, is recorded for the first time in Korea. A detailed description, illustrations of morphological features, and a brief discussion are provided.


IDENTIFICATION ATLAS OF THE VESPIDAE (HYMENOPTERA, ACULEATA) OF THE NORTHEASTERN NEARCTIC REGION
by M. Buck, S.A. Marshall and D.K.B. Cheung.
Canadian Journal of Arthropod Identification No. 5: 492 pp. (PDF version).
Published 19 February 2008, with 3 Tables and 1073 Figures (doi:10.3752/cjai.2008.05).
Available online at http://www.biology.ualberta.ca/bsc/ejou ... mc_05.html
--> Book Review
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/ab ... 08.00431.x
John Heraty (2008) Identification Atlas of the Vespidae (Hymenoptera, Aculeata) of the Northeastern Nearctic region - Edited by M. Buck, S.A. Marshall and D.K.B. Cheung
Systematic Entomology 33 (3) , 579–580
doi:10.1111/j.1365-3113.2008.00431.x


Jin-Kyung CHOI, Jong-Wook LEE (2008) Taxonomic study of the genus Charops Holmgren (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae: Campopleginae) from the Eastern Palaearctic Region
Entomological Research 38 (2) , 157–164 doi:10.1111/j.1748-5967.2008.00152.x
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/ab ... 08.00152.x
Abstract: We report three species – Charops brachypterus (Cameron, 1897), C. cantator (DeGeer, 1778) and C. striatus (Uchida 1932) – new to Korea. Of these, C. brachypeterus (Cameron, 1897) is recorded for the first time from the Eastern Palaeartic Region. A revised key to the species, descriptions, and photographs of diagnostic characters are provided.


Sung-Jin LEE, Jin-Dong YEO, Hyunchur SHIN (2008) Insect biogeography in the south-western Sea of Korea with comments on the insect fauna of Kwanmae Island
Entomological Research 38 (2) , 165–173
doi:10.1111/j.1748-5967.2008.00155.x
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/ab ... a%29%29%29
Abstract: The insect species richness of each island in the south-western Sea of Korea was considered on the background of the equilibrium theory. The species number of insects on Kwanmae Island in the present study (140 species) was much higher compared with a previous survey. Based on a literature survey of island biota surveys published in the 1980s, of 47 islands, the lowest species number (12 species) was on Kwanmae Island, and the most diverse insect fauna (254 species) was on Baekryong Island. The mean species number of surveyed islands was approximately 54 (53.96 with a standard deviation of 46.95). The median species number was 38 with a skew of +2.56. Insects, including the orders Odonanta, Orthoptera, Hemiptera, Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, Hymenoptera and Diptera, occurred on 32 of the 47 surveyed islands, and had an occurrence rate of more than 0.68. This indicates that these insects are distributed widely on the islands in the south-western Sea of Korea. The species number showed a significant linear relationship with both area of an island and its distance from the mainland (P < 0.05), with an extremely low determinant coefficient (r2 = 0.13 for area vs species number and r2 = 0.28 for distance vs species number). Other factors tested in the study failed to show a significant relationship with species number. A multiple-regression model established using area and distance as independent variables showed significant relationship with species number, with a relatively higher determinant coefficient (r2 = 0.70, P < 0.05). We present possible explanations to explain the difference between estimated and observed species number in Kwanmae Island.


RAFAEL D. LOYOLA AND ROGÉRIO P. MARTINS 2006: Trap-Nest Occupation by Solitary Wasps and Bees (Hymenoptera: Aculeata) in a Forest Urban Remanent. Neotropical Entomology 35(1):041-048 (2006).
ABSTRACT - Temporal variation of solitary wasps and bees, nesting frequency, mortality, and parasitism were recorded from a remanent forest in Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. Wasps and bees were collected in trap-nests placed in areas with 25, 100, and 400 m2, from February to November 2004. The 137 trap-nests collected contained 11 species of wasps and bees. Wasps occupied most nests (75%). Occupation peaks occurred in March (25%) and September (26%); in June, the lowest occupation (2%) was observed. Except for Trypoxylon (Trypargilum) lactitarse Saussure, no significant correlation was found between number of occupied nests, and temperature and rainfall means. In the nests, 48% of the immature specimens died; 13% of the nests were parasitized. Total death and parasitism rates of wasps and bees differed significantly.
KEY WORDS: Nesting behavior, mortality, parasitism, Trypoxylon lactitarse, Auplopus militaris


Rui Carlos Peruquetti (2005) Use of Trap Nests with a Neotropical Mud-Dauber, Trypoxylon (Trypargilum) albitarse Fabricius, 1804 (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae). Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society Volume 78, Issue 1, 84-87.
Resumen
É apresentado pela primeira vez o uso de ninhos-armadilhas por Trypoxylon albitarse Fabricius, 1804 (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae). De outubro de 2000 a fevereiro de 2001 foram amostrados, em uma reserva de Cerrado do Estado de São Paulo, sete ninhos-armadilha ocupados por esta espécie. Os diâmetros destes ninhos variaram de 12 a 20 mm e o comprimento de 150 a 200 mm. As fêmeas de T. albitarse não preencheram toda a cavidade dos ninhos-armadilhas e os ninhos amostrados não diferiram na aparência daqueles construídos livremente. Esta é a principal diferença entre os ninhos construídos em ninhos-armadilhas por T. albitarse e a espécie norte-americana Trypoxylon politum Say, 1837, para a qual havia o único registro de uso de cavidades preexistentes por espécies do grupo albitarse. São discutidos fatores que poderiam promover esta diferença.
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Re: new literature

Postby Eckart Stolle on 26 Jun 2008, 20:37

Jason M. Tylianakis, Alexandra-Maria Klein, and Teja Tscharntke (2005): SPATIOTEMPORAL VARIATION IN THE DIVERSITY OF HYMENOPTERA ACROSS A TROPICAL HABITAT GRADIENT. Ecology Volume 86, Issue 12, 3296–3302.
http://www.esajournals.org/perlserv/?re ... -0371&ct=1
Abstract
Understanding global biodiversity patterns requires analyses at multiple spatial and temporal scales, across a variety of different habitat types. We used a highly replicated study in coastal Ecuador to examine simultaneously for the first time spatial and temporal species turnover and the contribution of five different habitat types (rice, pasture, coffee agroforests, abandoned coffee agroforests, and native forest fragments) to regional diversity in the tropics, using the experimental placement of standardized nesting structures for bees and wasps. There was notable overlap in the communities of different habitat types, indicating that even intensively managed land can provide a valuable contribution to the overall biodiversity of the landscape mosaic. Importantly, there was a significant effect of habitat type on temporal variation in diversity. While intensive cropping systems such as rice and pasture exhibited higher diversity in certain months, greater species turnover through time in the abandoned coffee and forest plots accounted for the higher overall diversity in these habitats. Overall, spatial and temporal turnover explained 38.6% and 23.1%, respectively, of partitioned regional species richness. A quantitative analysis revealed that the relative habitat specificity of Hymenoptera decreased with increasing habitat disturbance.
Key words: additive partitioning, bee, Ecuador, temporal scale, trap nest, wasp


Mariana Marchi SantoniI; Marco Antonio Del Lama (2007):Nesting biology of the trap-nesting Neotropical wasp Trypoxylon (Trypargilum) aurifrons Shuckard (Hymenoptera, Crabronidae). Revista Brasileira de Entomologia. vol.51 no.3.
doi: 10.1590/S0085-56262007000300015
Fulltext: http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script= ... =e&nrm=iso
ABSTRACT
The present study was carried out in three localities of the state of São Paulo, Brazil: Araras (Dec/03-Dec/06), São Carlos (Nov/04-Nov/06) and Rifaina (Jul/04-Dec/06). Trap-nests were distributed among sites in the sampling areas and were collected every 35 days. Data from 295 nests indicate that T. aurifrons is a multivoltine species, with higher rates of nest building and cell production in the warm, rainy season. The trap-nests used by the females ranged from 117 to 467 mm in length and 3.1 to 16.6 mm in diameter. All nests showed deep plugs and a vestibular cell was found in 37% of the complete nests. The number of cells per nest ranged from one to 12. Females were larger than males, emerged from longer cells and their cocoons were significantly larger. A secondary 1:1 sex ratio was found in Araras and Rifaina. No correlation was observed between the diameter of the trap-nest and sex ratio. Males were usually oviposited in the first brood cells. Male and female developmental time from egg to adult was longer in the cold, dry season. Trypoxylon aurifrons provisioned their nests mainly with orb-spiders from the family Araneidae. The most important mortality factor was the death of immature forms, probably due to development failure. The most important parasitoid was Melittobia sp.
KEYWORDS. Nest architecture; parasitoid; prey; sex ratio; seasonality.


Isabel Alves-dos-Santos (): Trap-Nesting Bees and Wasps on the University Campus in São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil (Hymenoptera: Aculeata). Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society. Volume 76, Issue 2, 328–334
http://apt.allenpress.com/perlserv/?req ... -8567(2003)076%5B0328%3ATNBAWO%5D2.3.CO%3B2&ct=1
This paper reports the species of solitary bees and wasps nesting in wooden trap-nests on the campus of the University of São Paulo (23°33′S, 46°43′W), in southeastern Brazil, during three years (1998–2001). The wooden trap-nests offered circular holes 3 to 10 mm in diameter, drilled 5 to 12 cm deep. Rolled papers were inserted in the hole, so that the paper tube could later be periodically extracted to reveal the nest. Females of eight species of bees and eleven species of wasps occupied a considerable percentage of the trap nests. The two predominant bee species in the first two years were Tetrapedia diversipes Klug and Anthodioctes megachiloides Holmberg, while in the third year the population of Hylaeus spp. increased considerably and T. diversipes decreased. Wasps of the genus Trypoxylon were abundant during the studied period, and in 2001 populations of non-native Passaloecus pictus Ribaut increased. Natural enemies of the trap nest occupants were fungi, mites and Melittobia wasps.
Keywords: Diversity, abundance, seasonality, nidification, urban area
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Re: new literature

Postby Eckart Stolle on 26 Jun 2008, 20:55

Buschini, m. l. t., Niesing, f. and Wolff, l. l. (2006): Nesting biology of Trypoxylon (Trypargilum) lactitarse
Saussure (Hymenoptera, Crabronidae) in trap-nests in southern brazil. Braz. J. Biol., 66(3): 919-929, 2006
PDF: http://www.srcosmos.gr/srcosmos/showpub.aspx?aa=7766
AbstrAct
this study was carried in the parque municipal das araucárias in the municipality of guarapuava, state
of paraná, southern brazil. three hundred and sixty ive nests of T. lactitarse were obtained using trap-
nests of 0.7, 1.0, and 1.3 cm in diameter. all of them had similar architecture, regardless of the diameter
of the trap-nest. Completed nests consisted of a linear series of brood cells whose average number per nest
was of 3.3, 4.0 and 3.6 for the nests with 0.7 cm, 1.0 cm and 1.3 cm in diameter, respectively. they were
constructed more often during the summer. T. lactitarse had two types of life cycles: direct development
(without diapause), and delayed development (with diapause during winter). Natural enemies included
Chrysididae, sarcophagidae, dolichopodidae and ichneumonidae. out of 1,353 identiied spider prey,
1,313 belonged to the araneidae family.
Keywords: Trypoxylon lactitarse, Crabronidae, nesting biology, trap-nest, Hymenoptera.


Hisatomo Taki, Peter G. Kevan, Blandina F. Viana, Fabiana O. Silva, Matthias Buck (2008) Artificial covering on trap nests improves the colonization of trap-nesting wasps
Journal of Applied Entomology 132 (3) , 225–229 doi:10.1111/j.1439-0418.2007.01237.x
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/ab ... 07.01237.x
To evaluate the role that a trap-nest cover might have on sampling methodologies, the abundance of each species of trap-nesting Hymenoptera and the parasitism rate in a Canadian forest were compared between artificially covered and uncovered traps. Of trap tubes exposed at eight forest sites in six trap-nest boxes, 531 trap tubes were occupied and 1216 individuals of 12 wasp species of four predatory families, Vespidae (Eumeninae), Crabronidae, Sphecidae and Pompilidae emerged over 2 years, and no bee species were found. Results indicated that artificial covering led to a significant increase in the number of nested tubes of Ancistrocerus adiabatus, Ancistrocerus antilope, Ancistrocerus campestris and Auplopus mellipes, and significant effects of covering were not found for the other species. No significant difference in the overall parasitism rate between covered and uncovered traps was noted. These suggested that the covering technique could provide more opportunities for some wasp species to colonize trap nests.
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Re: new literature

Postby Eckart Stolle on 26 Jun 2008, 21:18

Camillo, E. (2001): Inquilines of Brachymenes dyscherus nests with special reference to Monobia schrottkyi (Hymenoptera, Vespidae, Sphecidae).Rev Biol Trop. 2001 Sep-Dec;49(3-4):1005-12.
Sixty-four inactive nests of the solitary mud-daubing wasp Brachymenes dyscherus, reused by 5 inquiline species, were collected at Fazenda Santa Carlota, Cajuru, São Paulo, Brazil in 1995 and 1996. Monobia schrottkyi used 52 nests; among the 717 cells available for use, 502 were reused. The number of cells per nest varied from 3 to 24; 1 to 16 individuals emerged from September to April (154 males and 112 females). Forty-six cells were parasitized by Melittobia sp. (n = 44) and Ichneumonidae (n = 2). Monobia curvata used 3 nests; among the 50 cells available for use, 38 were reused and 15 males and 8 females emerged from August to November. Three cells were parasitized by Ichneumonidae. Montezumia petiolata occupied 1 nest; among the 8 available cells, 7 were reused and 2 males and 3 females emerged in September. Podium denticulatum used 2 nests; the 20 cells available for use were reused and 11 males and 4 females emerged in August. Trypoxylon rogenhoferi used 5 nests that had 65 available cells; 48 of them were reused, from which 19 males and 11 females emerged from September to November. Three cells were parasitized by Ichneumonidae (n = 2) and Chrysididae (n = 1).


Camillo, E. (2002): The natural history of the mud-dauber wasp Sceliphron fistularium (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae) in southeastern Brazil. Rev Biol Trop. 2002 Mar;50(1):127-34.
Nests of Sceliphron fistularium were obtained in Colombia and Moji Guaçu, São Paulo, Brazil. Complete nests consisted of 1 to 54 sausage-shaped cells, arranged side by side along a horizontal axis, and found attached to electrical wires (Colombia, n = 7) and walls (Colombia, n = 4 and Moji Guaçu, n = 4). The number of cells per nest ranged from 1 to 54, their length varying from 20.8 to 29.7 mm, and their diameter from 7.6 to 11.7 mm. Brood cells were provisioned with spiders of the family Araneidae. Only Alpaida veniliae was collected in Colombia, whereas the most frequent species found in Moji Guaçu was Micrathena swainsoni (62.0%) followed by M. acuta (23.3%). Adults emerged from June to October. The length and diameter of female and male cells were similar. Nevertheless, females were significantly larger than males. The sex ratio of individuals obtained from nests was 1.16 females: 1 male. A life table was constructed, and details of the life cycle of the wasps and parasitoids are presented. The most common mortality factors were either unknown or due to the parasitoid wasp Melittobia sp.


Buschini ML, Wolff LL. (2006): Notes on the biology of Trypoxylon (Trypargilum) opacum Brèthes (Hymenoptera; Crabronidae) in Southern Brazil. Braz J Biol. 2006 Aug;66(3):907-17.
The present study investigated the abundance, seasonality and various life-history traits of Trypoxylon (Trypargilum) opacum. Using trap-nests, 320 nests of T. opacum were collected in the Parque Municipal das Araucárias in Southern Brazil (25 degrees 23' 36" S and 51 degrees 27' 19" W) over a 3 year period. Nesting was more frequent during the warm season. Nests consisted of a linear series of 1 to 8 brood cells separated by mud partitions, usually followed by an empty vestibular cell and final-closure mud plug. Brood cells were most commonly provisioned with spiders of the family Araneidae. Sex-ratio was strongly female biased, 3.4:1 females:males. Natural enemies attacking nests T. opacum included chrysidids, ichneumonids, sarcophagids, bombyliids and ants.
PDF: http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script= ... so&tlng=en

dto (2006): Nesting biology oF Centris (Hemisiella) tarsata Smith in southern Brazil (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Centridini). Braz J Biol. 2006 Nov;66(4):1091-101.
A total of 67 nests of Centris tarsata were obtained from wood trap-nests of different diameters, consisting of a linear series of brood cells built with sand mixed with oil. This species showed a preference for open habitats, since it occurred only in Swamp and Grassland areas and has never been found in the Araucaria forest. Nesting activity was bigger during the hot season, especially in December and January. The Sex ratio was of 1.48:1 (females/males), significantly different from 1:1. The females were larger than the males and these showed no dimorphism. Males were produced in the outermost cells and females in the innermost cells. C. tarsata presented a direct development without diapause in larval stage. They overwinter as adults. Development time was similar for males and females. Natural enemies are Bombyliidae Mesocheira bicolor, Coelioxys sp. and Meloidae.
PDF: http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script= ... so&tlng=en


Camillo, E. (2005): Nesting biology of four Tetrapedia species in trap-nests (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Tetrapediini). Rev Biol Trop. 2005 Mar-Jun;53(1-2):175-86.
The nests used in this study were obtained from trap-nests (tubes of cardboard and cut bamboo stems) placed on Santa Carlota Farm (Itaoca Section-IS, Santana Section-SS and Cerrado-Ce), Cajuru, SP, Brazil. The number of nests and corresponding species obtained were as follows: 516 nests of T. curvitarsis, 104 of T. rugulosa, 399 of T. diversipes and 98 of T. gamfaloi. The most abundant species from SS and Ce was T. curvitarsis, and from IS it was T. diversipes. In general, most nests were collected during the hot and wet season (September to April). The nests were constructed with sand and an oily substance, and a single female established them. The cells were constructed in a linear series, sometimes followed by a vestibular cell. The number of brood cells ranged from 1 to 10 in T. curvitarsis (n=200), and in T. garofaloi (n-51), from 1 to 8 (n-30) in T. rugulosa, and from 1 to 6 (n=37) in T. diversipes. The pollen mass (pollen + oily substance) contained a hollow, sometimes divided by a transverse ridge, on the exposed face of the pollen mass. The egg was vertically positioned in the lower part of the hollow. At times, the closing of a cell was initiated before provisioning was completed, with a construction of a collar at the cell limit. In some nests the final cellular partition also acted as a closure plug. Females began activities at 6:18 a.m. and ended between 3:31 and 6:26 p.m. Some females (T. curvitarsis, T. rugiulosa and T. ganrfaloi) did not spend the nights at their nests, returning to them only the following morning with additional material. In general, the development period (for males and females) was greater in nests collected near the end of the hot and wet season than it was for nests collected in other months. Sex ratios for each species were as follows: T. curvitarsis. 1:1: T. rugulosa, 1.6:1 female; T. diversipes, 1.9:1: T. garofaloi, 2.8:1. Males and females of T. diversipes exhibited statistically similar sizes and in the other three species the females were larger than the males. The mortality rates were statistically similar: 33.2% for T. curvitarsis, 25.8% for T. rugulosa, 26.8% for T. diversipes and 38.2% for T. garnfaloi. The parasitoids were: Coelioxoides exulans, Leucospis cayenensis, Anthrax sp., Coelioxys sp., Coelioxoides sp. and individuals of the family Meloidae.


Camillo E, Brescovit AD (2000) Spider prey (Araneae) of Trypoxylon (Trypargilum) rogenhoferi (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae) in southeastern Brazil. Rev Biol Trop. 2000 Jun-Sep;48(2-3):647-55.
Fifty five nests and 216 cells of Trypoxylon (Trypargilum) rogenhoferi were obtained from trap-nests (cut bamboo canes) in Santa Carlota Farm (Itaoca Section = IS and Santana Section = SS), Cajuru and on the São Paulo University Campus, Ribeirão Preto (= RP), both in the State of São Paulo, Brazil (Sept. 1993-Oct. 1995). The prey (spiders) of 40 cells from IS, 58 from SS and 39 from RP were identified. The greatest nesting frequency occurred during the hot and wet season (September to April). T. rogenhoferi preyed upon individuals of five spider families, with Araneidae (orb-weaver spiders) being the most frequent (99.6%). Alpaida aff. negro (58%) was the most frequently collected species in IS, followed by A. alto (24.8%); in SS (59.6%) and RP (64.7%) the most frequent species was A. veniliae, followed in SS by A. aff. negro (14.9%) and in RP by A. leucogramma (13.5%). The size of reproductive niches, H' = 1.25 (IS), H' = 1.30 (SS) and H' = 1.29 (RP) were not significantly different. There was a positive correlation between the reproductive niche width (H') and evenness.
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Re: new literature

Postby Eckart Stolle on 29 Jun 2008, 14:57

new Hymenoptera Paper in ZOOTAXA:
http://www.mapress.com/zootaxa/taxa/Hymenoptera.html

lots have open access --> PDF

check it out
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Re: new literature

Postby Eckart Stolle on 30 Jun 2008, 01:01

Allan H. SMITH-PARDO 2005
Systematics and mimicry of the genus Neocorynura: an example of two species from Central America (Hymenoptera: Halictidae)
Acta zoologica cracoviensia, 48B(1-2): 11-21, Kraków, 30 Sept., 2005
PDF http://www.isez.pan.krakow.pl/journals/ ... df/48B(1-2)/02.pdf

Abstract. A case of probable mimicry in two species of bees in the genus Neocorynura (Neocorynura rufa MICHENER, 1954 and N. panamensis ENGEL, 1997) is described; diagnostic characters and a key to separate the species of Central American bees with black-red (aposematic) pattern of coloration are also provided. The phylogeny of selected species groups and the evolution of different mimicries in the genus are discussed.
Keywords:BatesianandMüllerianmimicry,phylogeny,Panam|,CostaRica,Augochlorini.
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Re: new literature

Postby Eckart Stolle on 30 Jun 2008, 01:03

http://www.k-state.edu/kes/issue77_4.htm

has to be checked if they are in the library already - many papers on aculeate wasps




another list where u also can buy papers - i gonna check it later...
http://www.euronet.nl/users/backhuys/
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Re: new literature

Postby Eckart Stolle on 02 Jul 2008, 17:16

Journal Systematic Entomology
http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/jour ... 64631/home
bzw ebenfalls hier:
http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/jour ... 970&site=1
--> search for "hymenoptera" http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/sear ... icleGo.y=0
161 hits




Apidologie 23 (1992) 509-522
DOI: 10.1051/apido:19920603
Systematics, phylogeny and biogeography of the Meliponinae (Hymenoptera, Apidae): a mini-review
J.M.F. de Camargo and S.R. de Menezes Pedro
Abstract - The main proposals for systematics, phylogeny and biogeography of the Meliponinae, and the polarity and significance of some morphological characters are discussed. Although a set of probable synapomorphies is suggestive of the Meliponinae as a co-phyletic group with the Apinae, Bombinae and Euglossinae, the relationships with these subfamilies remain unclear. The distributional pattern and fossil record are indicative of greater antiquity for the Meliponinae and suggestive of an independent origin or an early divergence from a proto-other Apidae branch. The sister-group relationship between Malayan and neotropical Meliponinae (Tetragona-Tetragonisca line and possibly Trigonisca-Pariotrigona, Lisotrigona), and the probable relationship between Austroplebeia and the neotropical Plebeia line, are suggestive of a West-Gondwanan origin for the Meliponinae, with 2 main dispersal routes via the holarctic and panaustral regions.
Key words: systematics / biogeography / Apidae / Meliponinae / phylogeny
http://www.apidologie.org/index.php?opt ... RT0003.pdf


A re-evaluation of the phylogenetic relationships in the Apidae (Hymenoptera)
LYNN SIRIKIMSEY
ABSTRACT.
The relationships between the four tribes in the bee family Apidae are re-examined. Characteristics of the postgena, presternum, antenna cleaner, arolium, female hind tibia and male genitalia, among others, support the placement of these tribes in three subfamilies: Meliponinae (Meliponini), Apinae (Apini) and Bombinae (Euglossini + Bombini). The Apinae is the sister group of the Bombinae. This tribal arrangement was originally proposed, using different characteristics, by Winston & Michener (1977).
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-3113.1984.tb00519.x
http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/jour ... 1&SRETRY=0
Systematic Entomology
Volume 9 Issue 4, Pages 435 - 441
Published Online: 2 Jan 2008
Accepted 12 March 1984
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Re: new literature

Postby Eckart Stolle on 04 Jul 2008, 16:18

A cuckoo in wolves' clothing? Chemical mimicry in a specialized cuckoo wasp of the European beewolf (Hymenoptera, Chrysididae and Crabronidae)
Erhard Strohm, Johannes Kroiss, Gudrun Herzner, Claudia Laurien-Kehnen, Wilhelm Boland, Peter Schreier, and Thomas Schmitt
Front Zool. 2008; 5: 2. Published online 2008 January 11. doi: 10.1186/1742-9994-5-2.
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articl ... e=abstract
Abstract
Background
Host-parasite interactions are among the most important biotic relationships. Host species should evolve mechanisms to detect their enemies and employ appropriate counterstrategies. Parasites, in turn, should evolve mechanisms to evade detection and thus maximize their success. Females of the European beewolf (Philanthus triangulum, Hymenoptera, Crabronidae) hunt exclusively honeybee workers as food for their progeny. The brood cells containing the paralyzed bees are severely threatened by a highly specialized cuckoo wasp (Hedychrum rutilans, Hymenoptera, Chrysididae). Female cuckoo wasps enter beewolf nests to oviposit on paralyzed bees that are temporarily couched in the nest burrow. The cuckoo wasp larva kills the beewolf larva and feeds on it and the bees. Here, we investigated whether H. rutilans evades detection by its host. Since chemical senses are most important in the dark nest, we hypothesized that the cuckoo wasp might employ chemical camouflage.
Results
Field observations suggest that cuckoo wasps are attacked by beewolves in front of their nest, most probably after being recognized visually. In contrast, beewolves seem not to detect signs of the presence of these parasitoids neither when these had visited the nest nor when directly encountered in the dark nest burrow.
In a recognition bioassay in observation cages, beewolf females responded significantly less frequently to filter paper discs treated with a cuticular extract from H. rutilans females, than to filter paper discs treated with an extract from another cuckoo wasp species (Chrysis viridula). The behavior to paper discs treated with a cuticular extract from H. rutilans females did not differ significantly from the behavior towards filter paper discs treated with the solvent only.
We hypothesized that cuckoo wasps either mimic the chemistry of their beewolf host or their host's prey. We tested this hypothesis using GC-MS analyses of the cuticles of male and female beewolves, cuckoo wasps, and honeybee workers. Cuticle extracts of Hedychrum nobile (Hymenoptera: Chrysididae) and Cerceris arenaria (Hymenoptera: Crabronidae) were used as outgroups. There was little congruence with regard to cuticular compounds between H. rutilans females and honeybees as well as females of C. arenaria and H. nobile. However, there was a considerable similarity between beewolf females and H. rutilans females. Beewolf females show a striking dimorphism regarding their cuticular hydrocarbons with one morph having (Z)-9-C25:1 and the other morph having (Z)-9-C27:1 as the major component. H. rutilans females were more similar to the morph having (Z)-9-C27:1 as the main component.
Conclusion
We conclude that H. rutilans females closely mimic the composition of cuticular compounds of their host species P. triangulum. The occurrence of isomeric forms of certain compounds on the cuticles of the cuckoo wasps but their absence on beewolf females suggests that cuckoo wasps synthesize the cuticular compounds rather than sequester them from their host. Thus, the behavioral data and the chemical analysis provide evidence that a specialized cuckoo wasp exhibits chemical mimicry of the odor of its host. This probably allows the cuckoo wasp to enter the nest with a reduced risk of being detected by olfaction and without leaving traitorous chemical traces.
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Re: new literature

Postby Eckart Stolle on 05 Jul 2008, 17:39

# O’Connor, J.P., Nash,R. and Achterberg, C.van, 1999 A catalogue of the Irish Braconidae (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonoidea) Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society No.4 123 p. 7 figs., 4 plates ISBN here Complete synonymic catalogue. Lists type material.
# O’Connor, J.P, Nash, R and Boucek, Z., 2000 A catalogue of the Irish Chalcidoidea (Hymenoptera) Occasional Publication Irish Biogeographic Society 6 135 pp 19 plates, 12 figures ISBN here Complete synonymic catalogue. Lists type material.
# O'Connor, J.P, Nash, R., D.G. Notton. D.G and Fergusson, N. D. M., 2004 A catalogue of the Irish Platygastroidea and Proctotrupoidea Bull. Ir. Biogeog. Soc 110pp. ISBN 0-9511514-6-0. Complete synonymic catalogue. Lists type material.
# O'Connor, J.P, Nash,R. and Fitton, M.G., 2008 A Catalogue of the Irish Ichneumonidae Ir. Biogeog. Soc 310pp.ISBN-13: 978-0-9550806-1-6. Complete synonymic catalogue Lists type material.

more:
http://www.habitas.org.uk/rnpublications.html
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Re: new literature

Postby Eckart Stolle on 05 Jul 2008, 17:44

http://www.zin.ru/labs/insects/hymenopt ... onidae.pdf

Ichneumonidae (Hymenoptera) As Biological Control Agents Of Pests - A Bibliography
Hassan Ghahari (Teheran)
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