Bombus - Southern Spain

Bombus - Southern Spain

Postby Leif G on 10 Jul 2017, 23:05

Grazalema, Cádiz, Southern Spain, June 2017.
Maybe nothing more than Bombus hortorum but it doesn't look quite right except the long tongue.
I was also thinking of Bombus barbutellus but pollen bags on hind legs would exclude this species I suppose.
Very active, small species and difficult to photograph.

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Re: Bombus - Southern Spain

Postby Brachytron on 11 Jul 2017, 06:04

Hi!
Hortorum or ruderatus, no other options :D
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Re: Bombus - Southern Spain

Postby Leif G on 11 Jul 2017, 14:33

Thank you very much Jacek.

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Re: Bombus - Southern Spain

Postby Discoelius on 12 Jul 2017, 22:15

It's B. ruderatus, based on the characters (coat length, colour pattern) visible on the photograph and also on the fact that B. hortorum doesn't occur in southern Spain.
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Re: Bombus - Southern Spain

Postby Brachytron on 13 Jul 2017, 12:34

Discoelius wrote:...doesn't occur in southern Spain.
Discoelius


Its true but it is not impossible :D

http://www.atlashymenoptera.net/pagetax ... tx_id=3035
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Re: Bombus - Southern Spain

Postby Leif G on 13 Jul 2017, 18:24

Thank you very much Discoelius, for commenting my Bombus.

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Re: Bombus - Southern Spain

Postby Discoelius on 14 Jul 2017, 00:42

Brachytron:

As I said, my verdict is mainly based on (what appear to be) solid morphological and colour grounds, and I only spoke of distribution as a secondary argument, but since you mentioned the word "impossible" I'll explain why the distribution argument happens to be fairly strong in this case... The undisputed fact is that nobody has ever found B. hortorum in southern Spain; I wouldn't go as far as using the word "impossible" in this context, but I do think it's extremely unlikely that B. hortorum should ever be found, in Spain, south of a line that goes from the Javalambre mts. in Teruel province in the East to the "Sistema Central" mts. of Ávila-Segovia-Madrid to the Salamanca mountains in the west. To understand why, you have to travel a little in southern Spain: it's easy to see that climatic/biotic conditions there are generally clearly hostile for most bumblebees, with just a few of the toughest species present in some of the less difficult areas. In fact, in the low areas of southern Spain bumblebees are largely invisible, especially in July and August, and usually the only large/largish bees you see are the drought and heat specialists -- Xylocopa , Anthophora and the like. When you do see bumblebees, they're almost exclusively B. terrestris, occasionally accompanied by the odd B. vestalis or B. ruderatus; in some of the mountain "islands" there's alsoB. pascuorum and B. barbutellus, and in just a couple of mountain ranges you may also see B. pratorum , B. sylvestris and even (only in the Cazorla area, at some altitude) B. lapidarius; then, above 2500 m., in Sierra Nevada lives a close relative of B. hortorum, the endemic B. reinigiellus, hanging by a thread as its habitat shrinks and shrinks with global warming...
Cheers,

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Re: Bombus - Southern Spain

Postby Brachytron on 16 Jul 2017, 08:16

Thank you very much for your detailed explanation :D
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Re: Bombus - Southern Spain

Postby Libor on 17 Jul 2017, 00:48

Bombus hortorum is one of the most common species bread by companies as a pollinator of some field plants. So, introduction of B. hortorum to "new" regions is very possible as well as in the case of B. terrestris...
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Re: Bombus - Southern Spain

Postby Christian on 18 Jul 2017, 17:25

When you look to the colour pattern of the specimen, you can see a broad yellow band on scutellum. This shape is typical for B. ruderatus and not for B. hortorum. The latter has a narrow band. So B. ruderatus is more likely also from colour.
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